Searching \ for '[EE] Questions about neon lamp voltage' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: piclist.org/techref/power.htm?key=voltage
Search entire site for: 'Questions about neon lamp voltage'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] Questions about neon lamp voltage'
2012\07\06@012210 by RussellMc

face picon face
The use of a Neon lamp as a relaxation oscillator by Sony would be very
improbable - not impossible, but needs to be considered carefully.

What is the function of the device in the circuit?
How do you know?
What is the circuit around it?
What voltage was across it? O/C. S/C.
(ie if it is a realization oscillator or even just a neon it will be fed by
a Voltage higher than striking voltage via a resistor such as to limit the
available current to something low.

You are able to produce a FAR better photo than the one you supplied, and
should do so.
Whatever imaged that can do a better job than it did.


          Russel

2012\07\06@093010 by jim

flavicon
face
If I remember correctly, the inoization voltage of an NE2 neon lamp was
around 60-80 volts.  The sustaining voltage was around 40 to 50 volts or
so.  Both of these numbers are from memory, and may vary depending on
the particular lamp you have in hand.

Jim

Regards,

Jim

> ---{Original Message removed}

2012\07\06@132857 by Robert Rolf

picon face
Neon bulb were often used as voltage regulators or reference in CRT
circuits in the 1980's

On Fri, Jul 6, 2012 at 7:30 AM, <spam_OUTjimTakeThisOuTspamjpes.com> wrote:

>  If I remember correctly, the inoization voltage of an NE2 neon lamp was
> around 60-80 volts.  The sustaining voltage was around 40 to 50 volts or
> so.  Both of these numbers are from memory, and may vary depending on
> the particular lamp you have in hand.
>
> Jim
>

2012\07\06@151110 by YES NOPE9

flavicon
face
Here are more photos....
plus.google.com/u/0/photos/102396176247280453443/albums/5762128367636642529
Perhaps ( as a PICoid suggested ) the device is a spark gap.
My photo skills are not as Russell's are.  And I expect they never will be.
I do not know what the function of the device is.  It is located right next to the high voltage transformer that feeds the CRT tube.
Best
Gus


{Quote hidden}

> -

2012\07\06@162839 by Matt Bennett
flavicon
face
While Neon tubes are old tech, they still seem to be pretty commonly used-
I just noticed a glow coming from beneath my inspection microscope while
the fluorescent lamp started- the starter module on this not-very-old
piece of equipment uses a neon bulb.

Neon bulbs may not be the most modern of technology, but they still have
their place. Primitive, maybe, but if it does the job you want (and fits
the form factor, and meets your reliability targets, and ...) at a
competitive price, you're not left with a good reason to change.

Matt Bennett
Just outside of Austin, TX
30.51,-97.91

The views I express are my own, not that of my employer, a large
multinational corporation that you are familiar with.

On Fri, July 6, 2012 2:11 pm, YES NOPE9 wrote:
> Here are more photos....
>  plus.google.com/u/0/photos/102396176247280453443/albums/5762128367636642529
> Perhaps ( as a PICoid suggested ) the device is a spark gap.
> My photo skills are not as Russell's are.  And I expect they never will be.
> I do not know what the function of the device is.  It is located right
next to
> the high voltage transformer that feeds the CRT tube.
> Best
> Gus
>
>
>> On Jul 5, 2012, at 11:21 PM, RussellMc wrote:
>> The use of a Neon lamp as a relaxation oscillator by Sony would be very
improbable - not impossible, but needs to be considered carefully. What
is the function of the device in the circuit?
>> How do you know?
>> What is the circuit around it?
>> What voltage was across it? O/C. S/C.
>> (ie if it is a realization oscillator or even just a neon it will be
fed
>> by
>> a Voltage higher than striking voltage via a resistor such as to limit the
>> available current to something low.
>> You are able to produce a FAR better photo than the one you supplied, and
>> should do so.
>> Whatever imaged that can do a better job than it did.
>>           Russell
>> -

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2012 , 2013 only
- Today
- New search...